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Domestic Violence Rears Its Ugly Head

Posted on February 2, 2019 in Uncategorized

Domestic violence and domestic abuse assault are alive and well in the United States. From the time that we first wrote about this issue over eight years ago the only thing that has changed is that it appears that law enforcement officials are more aggressively pursuing domestic violence complaints. After all, they are a felony.

From a recent article about domestic violence comes this quote:

“Silence is part of the problem. Time and again it’s been shown that the secrecy shrouding domestic violence can allow it to escalate to more severe physical confrontations and tragic consequences. Silence also bolsters society’s illusion that domestic violence is not a more significant social problem, further isolating victims and abusers from getting help.”

If you think you’re doing your intimate partner a favor by keeping quiet about his assaults on you, you’re not. If you feel it’s too embarrassing to talk to a friend and help them in a domestic abuse assault situation, you’re not doing them any favors either.

Silence is not golden-especially in a domestic violence situation.

One out of every four women in the United States experiences intimate partner violence and this is not just limited to adult women. One in three high school age girls experiences violence in a dating relationship.

The percentage of women under the age of 18 who are raped by a family member is an absolutely disgusting 34%, and women who are homeless or have disabilities are especially vulnerable with their percentages over 50% likely that they will be the targets of domestic abuse assault.

The percentage of teen rape and abuse victims who report their assailant as an intimate partner is 76%.

Especially since law enforcement is taking these complaints more seriously, the chances of getting help from the law enforcement community is greatly increased. It used to be as recently as five or 10 years ago that domestic abuse or domestic violence complaints were given a wink and a nod by law enforcement-they just weren’t taken seriously. But thankfully those days appear to be over.

Women who are in a domestic abuse situation should not only arm themselves with a self-defense product like a stun gun or pepper spray, but they should seriously develop an escape plan.

A self-defense product can provide you precious minutes of relief in an assault so you can seek help. An escape plan would entail trusting a friend, neighbor or relative to harbor you in an emergency. You don’t want to leave your future in the hands of a shelter that may or may not be able to admit you.